Chinese idiom drama for kids coming to Beijing stage

Xu Fei China Plus Published: 2017-10-13 15:51:45
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A drama interpreting three Chinese idioms will soon be taking to the stage at the China National Theater for Children in Beijing.

Part of the play based on the Chinese idiom 'Mere Copycat' is shown to the media at the China National Theater for Children in Beijing on Thursday, October 12, 2017. [Photo: China Plus]

Part of the play based on the Chinese idiom 'Mere Copycat' is shown to the media at the China National Theater for Children in Beijing on Thursday, October 12, 2017. [Photo: China Plus]

It's part of a series created by the theater in 2014 called 'Box of Idioms,' which now comprises four productions, each containing three idioms.

The latest show features the 'Mere Copycat' (东施效颦) and 'Contradictory Behavior' (自相矛盾). 

Yin Xiaodong runs the children's theater.

"In terms of drama production, the theater places the emphasis on boosting traditional Chinese culture, introducing the classics of world literature, and reflecting realistic social issues. Each year, we try to bring a certain number of excellent dramas based on traditional Chinese culture to the stage. Chinese idioms are a favorite choice in making a drama, as they let us vividly present the wisdom of the Chinese people, their values and even Chinese philosophy."

The fourth in the 'Box of Idioms' series also contains the story based on 'Professed love of what one really fears.' (叶公好龙) It originates from a story about Lord Ye who lived in the ancient Spring and Autumn Period of ancient China (between 740 and 480 BC). 

Lord Ye often said he was fond of dragons, but when he actually came face to face with one, he was so scared out of his wits, he ran away as fast as he could.

The 'Box of Idioms' was presented to overseas audiences during the China Children's Theater Festival. 

As part of that festival, several young actors from the US Missoula Children's Theater also performed a drama based on Chinese idiom stories, namely 'Be There Just To Make Up The Numbers' (滥竽充数) and 'Carve on the Moving Boat to Find the Lost Sword.'(刻舟求剑)

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