Supreme Court allows Trump's revised travel ban in part

China Plus/AP Published: 2017-06-27 07:23:02
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People leave the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, June 26, 2017, as justices issued their final rulings for the term. The high court is letting a limited version of the Trump administration ban on travel from six mostly Muslim countries to take effect, a victory for President Donald Trump in the biggest legal controversy of his young presidency. [Photo: AP/J. Scott Applewhite]

People leave the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, June 26, 2017, as justices issued their final rulings for the term. The high court is letting a limited version of the Trump administration ban on travel from six mostly Muslim countries to take effect, a victory for President Donald Trump in the biggest legal controversy of his young presidency. [Photo: AP/J. Scott Applewhite]

The U.S. Supreme Court has announced that it will allow the Trump administration to go forward with a limited version of its travel ban from six mostly Muslim countries.

According to the Supreme Court, the 90-day ban can be enforced on visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen, unless they can prove a "credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States."

President Trump said in a White House statement that the Supreme Court decision is "a clear victory."

Simon Moshenberg, Director at the Legal Aid Justice Centre, calls the decision 'a partial' victory for President Donald Trump in the biggest legal controversy of his young presidency.

"And now, as of Thursday, the ban will go into effect against some people. And so I think you have no choice but to see it as at least a partial win for the Trump administration," said Moshenberg.

The Supreme Court decision overturned lower court orders that block and seek to lift the entire ban.

Earlier last week, Trump said that the ban would take effect 72 hours after being cleared by the courts, which means the travel ban may be partially enforced this week.

Lara Finkbeiner, Deputy Legal Director of the International Refugee Assistance Project, said they are disappointed with the decision.

"We are a nation that values acceptance and diversity and in making this decision today and putting the executive order back into effect this Supreme Court is sending a really clear message and is putting the executives discriminatory policy back into effect," said Finkbeiner.

The issue has been a big legal controversy during Trump's presidency since his original order signed in January sparked widespread protests days after he was sworn in.

Meanwhile, the Supreme Court also said it would hear arguments on the legality of one of Trump's signature policies in the court's fall term, which starts in October.

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